Silvio Savarese


Silvio Savarese

Seeing Objects and People in the 3D world: Visual Intelligence in Perspective

savareseAbstract: Computers can now recognize objects from images, classify simple human activities or reconstruct the 3D geometry of an environment.  However, these achievements are far from the kind of coherent and integrated interpretations that humans are capable of from just a quick glance of the complex 3D world. When we look at an environment such as a coffee shop, we don't just recognize the objects in isolation, but rather perceive a rich scenery of the 3D space, its objects, the people and all the relations among them. This allows us to effortlessly navigate through the environment, or to interact with objects in the scene with amazing precision or to predict what is about to happen next. In this lecture I will give an overview of the research from my group and discuss our latest work on designing visual models that can process different sensing modalities and enable intelligent understanding of the sensing data.  I will be also demonstrating that our models are potentially transformative in application areas related to autonomous or assisted navigation, smart environments, social robotics, augmented reality, and large scale information management

Bio: Silvio Savarese is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. He earned his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 2005 and was a Beckman Institute Fellow at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 2005–2008. He joined Stanford in 2013 after being Assistant and then Associate Professor (with tenure) of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, from 2008 to 2013. His research interests include computer vision, object recognition and scene understanding, shape representation and reconstruction, human activity recognition and visual psychophysics. He is recipient of several awards including a Best Student Paper Award at CVPR 2016, the James R. Croes Medal in 2013, a TRW Automotive Endowed Research Award in 2012, an NSF Career Award in 2011 and Google Research Award in 2010. In 2002 he was awarded the Walker von Brimer Award for outstanding research initiative.